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nicetacks:

takaakik:

zelanik:


mappymapache:

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reblogbookclub:

thegirlwiththeflowerinherhair:


The Spikes were ominous, casting shadows, their tips sharp, their edges serrated, but they were also beautiful. They changed the landscape, rendered it unfamiliar, even as they served their first purpose of protection from outsiders. She and Cal ventured onto an unfamiliar planet, into an unidentified galaxy. Or they themselves had shrunk; they were ants walking among blades of grass.

California, by Edan Lepucki

Our first Reblog Book Club III fan art! Gorgeous!

reblogbookclub:

thegirlwiththeflowerinherhair:

The Spikes were ominous, casting shadows, their tips sharp, their edges serrated, but they were also beautiful. They changed the landscape, rendered it unfamiliar, even as they served their first purpose of protection from outsiders. She and Cal ventured onto an unfamiliar planet, into an unidentified galaxy. Or they themselves had shrunk; they were ants walking among blades of grass.

California, by Edan Lepucki

Our first Reblog Book Club III fan art! Gorgeous!

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Vanessa Veselka on the Lack of Female Road Narratives

clockshopla:

Siddhartha wants liberation, Dante wants Beatrice, Frodo wants to get to Mount Doom—we all want something. Quest is elemental to the human experience. All road narratives are to some extent built on quest. If you’re a woman, though, this fundamental possibility of quest is denied. You can’t go anywhere if you can’t step out onto a road.

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clockshopla:

Clockshop’s MY ATLAS travelogue series this summer starts July 10th and will continue every Thurs. evening for 7 weeks. The series will present writers with travelogues in conjunction with a film, and a collaboration between Clockshop’s Julia Meltzer, filmmaker Courtney Stephens, and…

Article I wrote on this amazing travelogue series in LA this summer at Clockshop about the solo female traveler narrative.

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lareviewofbooks:

"Kate Zambreno and Roxane Gay have both written critically about the cultural imperative for female characters to be likable. The above reactions of irritation articulate a specific form of dislike, and dismissal — one that’s particularly gendered (and coupled with violence). Interestingly, they also mirror some critical reactions to that other popular narrative of/around the (white) girl,Girls, whose protagonist has similarly been called “irritating,”“annoying,”“self-absorbed,”“narcissistic.” In light of its republication and the likelihood of Green Girl reaching a still broader audience, I want to revisit these reactions to the book — which are really reactions to Ruth — with the goal not of fending off these judgments but of taking them seriously. If Ruth is irritating, why is she irritating, and — so?”
Megan Milks on Green Girl

lareviewofbooks:

"Kate Zambreno and Roxane Gay have both written critically about the cultural imperative for female characters to be likable. The above reactions of irritation articulate a specific form of dislike, and dismissal — one that’s particularly gendered (and coupled with violence). Interestingly, they also mirror some critical reactions to that other popular narrative of/around the (white) girl,Girls, whose protagonist has similarly been called “irritating,”“annoying,”“self-absorbed,”“narcissistic.” In light of its republication and the likelihood of Green Girl reaching a still broader audience, I want to revisit these reactions to the book — which are really reactions to Ruth — with the goal not of fending off these judgments but of taking them seriously. If Ruth is irritating, why is she irritating, and — so?”

Megan Milks on Green Girl

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theparisreview:

Geoff Dyer on the “oh shit” moment in writing.

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Utopia: The best show from across the pond Americans will never see

Author of Gone Girl Gillian Flynn is writing the remake of the British TV series Utopia, by playwright Dennis Kelly. Flynn will be working with director David Fincher on the project for HBO. 

I saw episodes of Utopia on a plane to England last year, and it was mind-boggling how unique and arresting the show was. Unfortunately, you can’t order it on DVD from America, unless you have one of those players that’s PAL-compatible or whatever. I know because I ordered it on Amazon, and sadly can’t play the DVD and watch the rest of the season. Sad clown. 

I tried to listen to Gone Girl on audio and couldn’t get into the voice of the author, or for that matter, the characters. Mary Gaitskill has more to say about this in Bookforum that’s worth a read. Generally, its ok to not like a piece of pop culture that’s in popular demand, more so now than it ever was before. 

That Flynn is going to try and write the remake is absurd, if you’ve ever seen the original version of the show. ABSURD. It looks like Kelly is also working on the American version as an executive producer, according to Entertainment Weekly, so who knows what they’ll come up with. I have my doubts its going to come anywhere near the original version. WHY does America have to do a remake of this awesome show? Why not just air the original version?? If its not broke, don’t fix it; a perturbed sentiment leaves me no other choice but to resort to cliches. 

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theparisreview:

In today’s World Cup recap, Rowan Ricardo Phillips on moving on: “Things happen in a World Cup that complicate the simple binary of wins and losses, of catastrophe and triumph.”

theparisreview:

In today’s World Cup recap, Rowan Ricardo Phillips on moving on: “Things happen in a World Cup that complicate the simple binary of wins and losses, of catastrophe and triumph.”

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filmsdivisionindia:

Perspectrum
Director: Ishu Patel
Year: 1975
(6:22)

By the February of 1966, Ishu Patel had already come a long way for a 23-year-old kid from the sticks. Born to a farming family in a small village in Gujarat, he had gone on to graduate from the Fine Arts program at MS University, Baroda in 1963, when he was selected by Gira Sarabhai to train as an “apprentice” at the National Institute of Design in Ahmedabad, then still housed on the second floor of the Corbusier building known as the Sanskar Kendra. It was an invitation to join the advance team of one of post-colonial India’s most remarkable experiments in modernity.

The years that followed had included high-profile visits from figures like Louis Kahn, Frei Otto, Buckminster Fuller and John Cage — the latter arriving in the company of the Merce Cunningham Dance Company, which performed at Ahmedabad’s “Town Hall” in 1964 — not to mention NID guiding lights Ray and Charles Eames. Especially significant for Patel was the presence of legendary Swiss-born graphic designer and educator Armin Hofmann, who was on the faculty in 1965. Ahmedabad had become a key, if unlikely, way station in the cosmopolitan circuitry of international art and design. So it really wasn’t all that surprising to be going to a party that February in honor of yet another prestigious visitor: the Indophilic Magnum photographer Henri-Cartier Bresson.

Cartier-Bresson had, in fact, already been around Ahmedabad for a few months by then, although you would scarcely know it. He kept a low profile, venturing out with NID founding faculty member and longtime friend Dashrath Patel to photograph the city and its people, working with a young photographer and technician named Parmanand Dalwadi in NID’s bustling darkroom — all students at NID were, at the time, required to learn how to process film and make prints — but otherwise keeping to himself. It was his fifth visit to India and, after Ahmedabad, he planned to travel to Allahabad to photograph the Kumbh Mela and then to Jaipur, where the Congress Party was holding a session with India’s brand new Prime Minister Indira Gandhi (who was friendly with Cartier-Bresson) in attendance. Ishu Patel had seen Cartier-Bresson from afar, had watched Dalwadi process his negatives and handled the master’s contact prints, but before that evening in February, they had never actually met.

Then he was recruited to help out with the party.

It was an unusual assignment, to be sure. The occasion was Maha Shivratri and — as per tradition on Lord Shiva’s day — there was to be bhang. Obviously someone had to test it out beforehand, for strength. To be on the safe side, Patel and several of the other apprentices took a full dose of bhang lassi and then some. It seemed fine. It seemed better than fine. Cartier-Bresson arrived at the party, was offered the bhang, consumed just a small amount and… promptly freaked out. According to Patel, the doyen of le moment décisif “could not tolerate the experience. We got scared, rushed him to the family doctor and the party was over!”

Such was the life of an apprentice at NID during its first decade. Patel went on to accompany Cartier-Bresson as his personal assistant on the trip to Allahabad and Jaipur, an experience he recounts in wonderful detail. They remained in touch, and Patel later visited Cartier-Bresson in Paris, in March of 1968, during a break from a yearlong period of study with Armin Hofmann at the Allegemeine Gewerbschule in Basel. They went out one night to Le Lido.

In 1970, Patel received a Rockefeller Foundation scholarship to study animation in the US — he had been hand-picked by the Sarabhais to become NID’s first faculty in the medium and had already worked under Leo Lionni and Giulio Gianini on the fabulous handcut paper animation “Swimmy.” He managed to turn this into an opportunity to spend a year at the National Film Board of Canada, working with one of his heroes, Norman McLaren. McLaren had taught animation in India in 1952 under the auspices of UNESCO and his films were frequently screened at NID; to be able to actually meet and work with him was the high point in Patel’s career. Patel resigned from NID in 1972 — the institution was in a state of crisis at the time — and returned to Canada to join McLaren at the NFBC, where he spent the next twenty-five years making his own films, producing the work of other animators and mentoring generations of young animators.

Perspectrum" (1975) would go well with a heady draught of that bhang lassi: animated using paper cutouts, it shows how well Patel was able to assimilate the influences of McLaren, Hofmann, Gianini, Lionni and Indian design gurus like Dashrath Patel and H. Kumar Vyas — and it is a splendid example of Patel’s own ingenuity, one born from years of working with minimal equipment and supervision in the self-guided learning environment that was the hallmark of NID’s first decade. Prepare yourself for six minutes of dancing, folding geometric abstraction set to a recording of lovely koto music by Michio Miyagi. World music for the eyes.

Special bonus: Patel’s first film after his return to Canada “How Death Came to Earth" (1972). Sadly, the only version of this mythopoetic, Gianini-influenced animation available online has had its original sound replaced by the uploader, and is missing the last 5 minutes. But press the mute button and have a look: this little wonder of a film owes much to influences from Patel’s rural childhood in the 1950s, one he describes as characterized by “no electricity, scary pitch black nights in the village with only tiny fires burning, fantastic stories, superstitions, deaths, births, marriages, birds and animals, foliage and flowers, farming methods, folklore, travelling puppet theatres, music, colour, life, etc.”

Tags: india